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Thanksgiving on Norfolk Island

Thanksgiving on Norfolk Island


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How did the American holiday tradition influence a tiny island in the South Pacific?

Norfolk Island is a small island between Australia and New Zealand.

Perhaps the most unexpected place where one will find a Thanksgiving celebration inspired by the American tradition is on Norfolk Island, a small island in the South Pacific.

Click here to see the Thanksgiving Holidays Around the World Slideshow!

The island, which is a little more than 13.36 square miles and has about 2,100 residents, is about 904 miles from Brisbane, Australia. Locals on the island speak English and also communicate in a Norfuk dialect (a mix of English and Tahitian), and the area is technically considered to be an Australian territory.

This background info still begs the question of how Thanksgiving came to this part of the world. According to an islander Thanksgiving expert, the holiday was formally introduced to the island in the mid-1890s when Isaac Robinson, an American trader who came to Norfolk as an agent and eventually became "the island’s first (and so far only) United States consul."

Robinson suggested decorating the All Saints Church with palm leaves and lemons in the capital of Kingston and the tradition stuck. Today, families celebrate on the fourth Wednesday of November by bringing produce to sell to help raise money for church upkeep. They also sing American hymns and sharing a potluck meal of "cold pork and chicken, pilhis, bananas... [and] pumpkin pie."

Want to add a little island flavor to your Thanksgiving meal? Check out these pilhi recipes.


Liberia was founded in the XIX century by freed slaves from the United States, Liberia never knew the colonial power of European countries like other African countries. Liberia’s name comes from Latin word Liber, meaning free. Liberia was founded as a colony by the American Colonization Society between 1821 and 1822, it was intended to be a place for slaves freed in the United States and that wanted to immigrate to Africa in search of more personal freedom and equality as citizens. Also the capital city of Liberia, Monrovia was named after the fifth president of the United States, James Monroe, supporter of the colonization of Liberia by free slaves. And so the free men brought with them many of the United States traditions and kept them as to honor their humble beginnings. Thanksgiving Day is one of them, and Liberians still celebrate it, same way as Americans do it, but of course with Liberians unique cultural touches.

Thanksgiving is celebrated to give thanks to God and Americans for freeing the slaves and granting them Liberia in Africa to live as free men. Thanksgiving is also an opportunity for Liberians to recognize the good things that life has to offer them, even though the country has been troubled by internal conflicts. It is a day celebrated with families’ gatherings and eating chicken roasting and green bean casserole and mashed cassavas. Liberians like their food hot and spicy, so cayenne and other peppers may be added to Liberian Thanksgiving dishes. As with all Liberian celebrations, there is plenty of music, song, and dance during Thanksgiving Day.


Here Are 16 Stores Open on Thanksgiving 2020, in Case You Need a Few More Ingredients

Turkey trot on over to these stores with special Thanksgiving hours.

It's no secret that Thanksgiving Day is a day packed with meaningful traditions, like a huge Thanksgiving menu including roasted turkey and plenty of Thanksgiving side dishes, reflecting on your blessings, and spending time with friends and family. With all of the excitement around this holiday also comes a lot of preparation, meaning you need to make sure you have everything you need so that all of your signature Thanksgiving recipes come together. So if you find yourself missing a key ingredient on the big day&mdashhey, it happens&mdashyou may be wondering what stores are open on Thanksgiving.

However, aside from delicious food and an all-day cooking event, the fourth Thursday of November also signals something else for many&mdashthe start of the Christmas season, which means you probably have to start shopping for Christmas presents! If that's the case, you may be wondering what stores are open on Thanksgiving so you can get a head start (and possibly beat the Black Friday crowds too). With the news that some of the big chains like Target and Walmart are staying closed on Thanksgiving this year, it's a good idea to check with your store of choice before heading out the door. (Check out these restaurants open on Thanksgiving too, and know which stores are closed on Thanksgiving.)

Need a few last-minute groceries? Hours may vary for your local store, but ACME has been open on Thanksgiving in years past.

Rite Aid is opening up bright and early for all your Turkey Day purchases. Although most locations will open at 7 a.m., some schedules might vary, so make sure you check your local store ahead of time.

The majority of Walgreens stores will open up at 8 a.m. on Thanksgiving. However, some stores might have different hours, so just call ahead before you stop by.

Locations typically stay open on Thanksgiving Day, but check with your local store for hours.

If you're looking for a gift or something for yourself, you can drop by Victoria's Secret on Thanksgiving&mdashbut not until later in the day. Most stores were open by 5 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day last year.

After watching the store's iconic Thanksgiving Day parade, you may be tempted to head to your local location. Luckily for you, you can! Macy's will open at 5 p.m. on Thanksgiving.

You can't beat that price&mdashor that opening time. Last year, Dollar General stores opened its doors at 7 a.m.

There's lots to be excited about here. Big Lots opened bright and early on Thanksgiving in 2019&mdashat 7 a.m.!

Yes, Family Dollar locations will be open on November 26&mdashbut hours vary by location. Make sure you check your local store's schedule before you head out.

Ulta has not yet confirmed their Thanksgiving hours for 2020. However, stores were open at 6 p.m. last year.

Head on over to your local Gordmans at 5 p.m. on Thanksgiving. You can do a little holiday shopping for everyone in the family.

Don't worry&mdashwe won't tell anyone you went to Old Navy to do a little shopping for yourself. Doors opened at 6 p.m. on Thanksgiving last year.

The majority of Cabela's store will be open with limited hours and will close around 6 p.m. on Thanksgiving Day. Make sure you check out your local store for hours.

Most Bass Pro Shops will be open on Thanksgiving Day with limited hours. Check your local store for hours.

Get a jump start on holiday crafting! Most Michaels stores are open on Thanksgiving.


Celebrating Thanksgiving on Norfolk Island

Anne Lim | November 22nd, 2017 10:49 AM | Add a Comment

Thanksgiving is a big deal on Norfolk Island, the hilly island 1400km east of Brisbane defined by pine trees, jagged cliffs, and a colourful history as a penal colony and refuge for Bounty mutineers.

Up to a quarter of Norfolk Islanders attend church on Thanksgiving, either the Church of England, Methodist or Seventh Day Adventist church. This large influx is thanks to three factors – the island’s Christian history, its American connections, and its reliance on a bountiful harvest.

Corn stalks are tied to church pews and local produce laid at the altar during the Thanksgiving service at All Saints Church.

“Our church attendance on Thanksgiving would be bigger than Christmas and Easter,” says David Fell, who has been full-time minister of Norfolk Island Church of England since 2015.

“We’ll be packed to the gunwales we’ll have something like four or five hundred people in All Saints for Thanksgiving, so it’s chock-a-block … It’s the one day that our nominals come to church, even more than Christmas and Easter.”

“Our church attendance on Thanksgiving would be bigger than Christmas and Easter.” –David Fell

The community of Norfolk Island has been coming together to celebrate Thanksgiving ever since American trader Isaac Robinson first decorated All Saints Church for Thanksgiving in the mid-1890s. As an agent of shipping line Burns Philp, the Registrar of Lands and the island’s first and only US Consul, Robinson had friends among the many American whalers on the island and it must have seemed the obvious thing to do.

“We’re an island of stories and Thanksgiving is part of the story.” – David Fell.

The former Bounty mutineers, who had come to Norfolk in the 1850s after they outgrew Pitcairn Island, had always celebrated the English Harvest Festival in line with the traditions they remembered from church life in England.

Enjoying the harvest on Norfolk Island for Thanksgiving

But the year after Robinson used palm leaves and lemons to decorate the church for the first Thanksgiving, parishioners brought down all kinds of produce to adorn the church, and a tradition developed of tying corn stalks to the pew ends and piling flowers on the holy table and around the font.

“At first, the families took home the fruit and vegetables after the service, but these days they auction it off and raise money for the church for maintenance and for staff,” says Fell.

“There’s a variety of banana dishes and they’ll always feature on Thanksgiving day.”– David Fell

While All Saints has the biggest service, the Methodist church and the Seventh Day Adventist church on the island also have their own Thanksgiving services.

Another reason Norfolk Islanders celebrate Thanksgiving is their connection to the land and its harvest.

“The thing about living on Norfolk Island is none of our fresh food is imported – it’s all grown here because of our strict quarantine laws – we are very much dependent on the produce of the island, so we’re one of the few places left where Thanksgiving kind of makes sense,” notes Fell.

David Fell auctions off some meat as part of the Thanksgiving festivities.

“There’s no reticulated water, we’re all on rainwater tanks, and so, in that sense, it really is a harvest festival where we thank God for the provision of rain – it’s a place that feels very dependent on God and provision.”

Unlike in America, however, there will be no turkeys on Norfolk Island’s Thanksgiving dinner tables.

“It’s a place that feels very dependent on God and provision.”– David Fell

“People collect whale bird eggs – they’re a bit of a delicacy. It’s much like a Christmas lunch so there’ll be a big ham on the table, and our church Thanksgiving lunch will be a bit of a pot luck. There are island dishes, they do a lot of banana dishes – things with overripe bananas, under-ripe bananas, ripe bananas – there’s a variety of banana dishes and they’ll always feature on Thanksgiving day.”

The huge four-storey All Saints Church is one of two historic locations where Fell conducts services. The main morning service and Sunday school are held at St Barnabas Chapel, the old headquarters of the Melanesian mission. But All Saints is bigger, so as well as offering a 1662 Prayer Book evening service mainly for tourists, it also hosts the big celebrations such as Christmas and Thanksgiving.

“We’re an island of stories and Thanksgiving is part of the story, I guess,” says Fell.

“Ellen White … was gripped by this story of this Edenic-like Christian community.” – David Fell

Another reason Thanksgiving continues as a cultural remnant on Norfolk Island is its Christian history through the Pitcairners.

Fell says Norfolk Islanders still remember the Pitcairn hymns of that era and the Pitcairn Anthem, which are sung at funerals and public occasions.

“John Adams, who was the last surviving mutineer, should have been hung but he was pardoned because they found he was leading a small Christian community when all those decades later they found him [on Pitcairn Island], so that became part of the story, part of the reason that they were given a spot on Norfolk Island,” says Fell.

“And that’s why, coincidentally, the Seventh Day Adventists were so represented on Norfolk Island and Pitcairn because Ellen White in upstate New York at the time when her denomination was forming was gripped by this story of this Edenic-like Christian community on Pitcairn Island that was following the teachings of the Bible far away from the evils of society – they really were famous at that time.”


How Thanksgiving Became A Holiday On Remote Norfolk Island

Many a Wikipedia user visits the website’s Thanksgiving page around this time of year as a refresher course on the holiday’s historical roots. The page offers little surprise for those who stayed awake during their elementary school history class -- that is, until they glance at the list of countries that observe Thanksgiving and find this at the very bottom: Norfolk Island.

How did the most American of holidays end up on a remote Australian territory in the middle of the South Pacific?

Here’s where you may need a true history refresher: Once a British penal colony, Norfolk Island is populated by the descendants of the H.M.S. Bounty's mutineers and their Tahitian captives, who were made famous in the 1962 Marlon Brando film "Mutiny on the Bounty."

The island today is perhaps best known for its biggest export: the Norfolk Island pine, an ornamental sapling that's vaguely reminiscent of a poorly spaced artificial Christmas tree. But the foliage is only part of Norfolk's unique charm. Elegant convict-built Georgian buildings dot the Kingston and Arthur's Vale Historic Area, many locals converse in Norfuk (an intriguing blend of 1700s English and Tahitian), and if you’re around in November, you can celebrate Thanksgiving.

Lisa Richards of the Norfolk Island Museum said that Tom Lloyd, ex-editor of the local paper, the Norfolk Islander, was the resident expert on all things Thanksgiving.

“On Norfolk Island there is one day when all congregations join together, and that is to celebrate Thanksgiving Day,” he explained. “The Pitcairners always celebrated the English Harvest Home festival, but it was not until the mid-1890s that All Saints Church was specially decorated for the service.”

This was Isaac Robinson's idea, Lloyd said. Robinson was an American trader who settled on Norfolk as agent for Burns Philp & Co Ltd., later becoming Norfolk's Registrar of Lands and the island's first (and so far only) United States consul.

“The idea of Norfolk having an American consul does sound slightly absurd today,” Lloyd admits, “but in those days American whalers made frequent calls, and Robinson proposed dressing the church up American-style for Thanksgiving.”

Three of Robinson’s friends helped him decorate All Saints Church in the capital, Kingston, using only palm leaves and lemons, and though he died and was buried at sea the next year, his notion caught on. For Norfolk’s second Thanksgiving service, the parishioners brought down all sorts of produce to decorate the church.

“The tradition became to tie corn stalks to the pew ends and pile flowers on the altar and the font,” Lloyd said. “At first, each family took home its own fruit and vegetables after the service, but today they are sold to raise money for church preservation.”

If one Thanksgiving just isn’t enough, there’s still time to book a trip down to Norfolk Island. The remote territory between New Zealand and Australia celebrates its Thanksgiving on the last Wednesday of November, similar to the pre-World War II American observance of the holiday on the last Thursday of the month.

Be prepared to sing some American hymns, particularly those with special meaning for the islanders, like "Let the Lower Light be Burning" and "In the Sweet Bye and Bye." You can also expect to eat the traditional fare of cold pork and chicken, pilhis, banana and, like any good American celebration, pumpkin pie.


Celebrating Thanksgiving with Family in Seattle

It always brings beautiful memories when I think of the time, my husband and I went to Seattle to celebrate Thanksgiving with our son and his wife's family.

Thanksgiving was a new experience for us as we don't celebrate it in Mexico, England or Australia (except for a small island). These are the countries I have been living most of my life.

Despite the fact that we lived in San Diego, California for four years, we didn't have an American family back then. When our youngest son married his lovely American fiance from Seattle, it was then, we could experience what a true Thanksgiving celebration was.

This year, we are in Australia. We won't be joining them on this occasion, however, as the day is approaching I take great pleasure on such fond memories.

When is Thanksgiving?

It always falls on the fourth Thursday in November. This year, it is on Thursday, November 28.

Thanksgiving is surely the most celebrated holiday in America and it may be the most important dinner of the year. For us, who are not Americans, it was a totally foreign holiday when we first arrived in San Diego, however, we always felt there was a special Thanksgiving magic on that particular day.

History of Thanksgiving Day

Thanksgiving is a Federal holiday in the United States. It has been celebrated nationally on and off since 1789. President Franklin D. Roosevelt made it an official holiday in 1939 and by 1941 Congress approved it.

The "First Thanksgiving" was celebrated by the Pilgrims after their first harvest in the New World in October 1621 in what is now Plymouth, Massachusetts.

Refugees from England, known as Pilgrims, invited the local Native Americans to a harvest feast after they experienced a successful season of productivity growth. The sentiment is that the settlers wanted to show their gratitude to the natives for their help by hosting a large feast.

Thanksgiving is a celebration of the close family and friends and the fall harvest. At its heart, the holiday holds a deep sense of gratitude. It is a day to &ldquogive thanks.&rdquo

Thanksgiving is the beginning of the fall-winter holiday season, along with Christmas and the New Year, in American culture.

Amazing Thanksgiving Meal

I enjoyed very much seeing how the whole family took great care of planning this special day. Families and even friends come together, some of them travel long distances to share the day with their loved ones to share a very special meal.

It&rsquos probably not surprising that there&rsquos an American holiday based solely around eating, As a result of the size of Thanksgiving dinner, Americans eat more food on Thanksgiving than on any other day of the year.

The following were some of the traditional dishes we enjoyed on the day:

Turkey, Ham, Stuffing and Dressings, Mash Potatoes, Cranberry Sauce, Sweet Corn, Sweet Potato, Vegetable sides, such as Squash, Brussels Sprouts, Green Bean Casserole, Salads, Bread Rolls, Pumpkin pie, Apple pie, and much more.

Thanksgiving dinner is delicious but the leftovers are often even better. A combination of roast turkey, bread, stuffing and cranberry sauce makes a succulent Thanksgiving sandwich.

The Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade

The Thanksgiving Day Parade has been a holiday institution since 1924. From balloon versions of cartoon characters to performances by popular musicians, casts of Broadway shows, and marching bands from all over the country, for everyone to enjoy.

Football Games to Watch

This is an activity that our family enjoys very much. American football is one of the many traditions in American culture that is associated with Thanksgiving Day.

A variety of games are scheduled to play over the course of the weekend, sports fans have plenty of options on Thanksgiving Day (Thursday) and the following weekend (Friday, Saturday, and Sunday)

For those who are not in sports, day-long sitcoms, movie marathons or anything you can think of on TV. Curling up on the couch is blissfully acceptable on Thanksgiving.

Every family has their own unique way of celebrating Thanksgiving. Playing a competitive board game make Thanksgiving extra special.

A Celebration for Everyone

Since Thanksgiving is not connected with any religion, it's one of the most inclusive holidays around. Anyone can enjoy Thanksgiving and the traditions that go along with it.

Black Friday & Cyber Monday

The earliest evidence of the phrase Black Friday applied to the day after Thanksgiving in a shopping context. The term originated in Philadelphia, where it described the heavy and disruptive pedestrian and vehicle traffic that would occur on the day after Thanksgiving.

Many stores offer highly promoted sales on Black Friday and open very early. Black Friday has routinely been the busiest shopping day of the year in the United States. It is a public holiday in more than 20 states and is considered the start of the US Christmas shopping season.

Many non-retail employees and schools have both Thanksgiving and the following Friday off, which, along with the following regular weekend, makes it a four-day weekend, thereby increasing the number of potential shoppers.

For those who don&rsquot like crowds, Cyber Monday was invented as the online shopping equivalent on the following Monday &ndash and increasingly a big deal all over the world.

Our time with the family celebrating Thanksgiving was one of the best time we have ever had. But, it is important to remember that the original intent of the holiday was to show appreciation to the family and friends, and Thanksgiving brought us together.

Why Does a Small Territory of Australia Observe Thanksgiving?

It may come as a surprise but many residents of Australia&rsquos Norfolk Island celebrate every year Thanksgiving.

Norfolk is an Australia Island, hundreds of miles away from both Australia and New Zealand in the Pacific Ocean.

The American festival is the highlight of Norfolk Island&rsquos Taste of Norfolk festival, which runs for three days in November.

Back in the 19th century, Norfolk Island was a British penal colony. It also became the home of the descendants of the H.M.S. Bounty&rsquos mutineers and their Tahitian captives. American whaling ships made it a frequent port of call and they brought with them many American recipes, such as cornbread and pumpkin pies.

American trader Isaac Robinson is credited as the man who brought Thanksgiving on Norfolk Island in the mid-1980s. The whaler settled on Norfolk as a Burns Philp & Co Ltd and later became Norfolk&rsquos Registrar of Lands and the island&rsquos first United States consul.

&ldquoIn those days American whalers made frequent calls, and Robinson proposed dressing the church up American-style for Thanksgiving,&rdquo Robinson told the International Business Times.

One thing is for sure, Thanksgiving, giving thanks, showing gratitude and appreciation can be shared and celebrated any time of the year by all.

If you celebrate Thanksgiving in your country, please share your experiences. We'd love to hear from you.


Thanksgiving on Norfolk Island

Since the 1890’s the community of Norfolk Island have been decorating All Saints Kingston and celebrating Thanksgiving together.

The Pilgrims, following their first harvest in the New World in 1621, hosted the very first Thanksgiving a celebration feast offering thanks to God for his bountiful provision, protection and care over them in the New World.

The first U.S. National Thanksgiving day of celebration started with a proclamation signed October 3, 1789 by the country’s first president, George Washington. Whereas it is the duty of all Nations to acknowledge the providence of Almighty God, to obey his will, to be grateful for his benefits, and humbly to implore his protection and favor—and whereas both Houses of Congress have by their joint Committee requested me “to recommend to the People of the United States a day of public thanksgiving and prayer to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many signal favors of Almighty God especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness.”

In 1863 amid the civil war, Abraham Lincoln proclaimed a National Thanksgiving Day “No human counsel hath devised nor hath any mortal hand worked out these great things. They are the gracious gifts of the Most High God, who, while dealing with us in anger for our sins, hath nevertheless remembered mercy. It has seemed to me fit and proper that they should be solemnly, reverently, and gratefully acknowledged, as with one heart and one voice, by the whole American people. I do therefore invite my fellow-citizens in every part of the United States, and also those who are at sea and those who are sojourning in foreign lands, to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next as a day of thanksgiving and praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the heavens.

And I recommend to them that while offering up the ascriptions justly due to Him for such singular deliverances and blessings they do also, with humble penitence for our national perverseness and disobedience, commend to His tender care all those who have become widows, orphans. mourners, or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife in which we are unavoidably engaged, and fervently implore the interposition of the Almighty hand to heal the wounds of the nation and to restore it, as soon as may be consistent with the divine purposes, to the full enjoyment of peace, harmony, tranquility, and union.

How did the most American of holidays end up on a remote Australian territory in the middle of the South Pacific?

“On Norfolk Island there is one day when all congregations join together, and that is to celebrate Thanksgiving Day,” he explained. “The Pitcairners always celebrated the English Harvest Home festival, but it was not until the mid-1890s that All Saints Church was specially decorated for the service.”

This was Isaac Robinson’s idea, Lloyd said. Robinson was an American trader who settled on Norfolk as agent for Burns Philp & Co Ltd., later becoming Norfolk’s Registrar of Lands and the island’s first (and so far only) United States consul.

“The idea of Norfolk having an American consul does sound slightly absurd today,” Lloyd admits, “but in those days American whalers made frequent calls, and Robinson proposed dressing the church up American-style for Thanksgiving.”

Three of Robinson’s friends helped him decorate All Saints Church in the capital, Kingston, using only palm leaves and lemons, and though he died and was buried at sea the next year, his notion caught on. For Norfolk’s second Thanksgiving service, the parishioners brought down all sorts of produce to decorate the church.

“The tradition became to tie corn stalks to the pew ends and pile flowers on the altar and the font,” Lloyd said. “At first, each family took home its own fruit and vegetables after the service, but today they are sold to raise money for church preservation.”


What is Thanksgiving, anyway?

Although best known around the world as an American holiday, Thanksgiving is officially observed in four countries:

  • Canada: the second Monday in October (2020 date: 12 October)
  • Liberia: the first Thursday in November (2020 date: 5 November)
  • Saint Lucia: the first Monday in October (2020 date: 5 October)
  • United States: the fourth Thursday in November (2020 date: 26 November)

In these countries, Thanksgiving arose out of the autumn harvest and a desire to show collective gratitude. This holiday feast historically featured ingredients freshly harvested from autumnal crops. Although the dishes commonly made for a Thanksgiving meal have changed over the years, the idea remains the same: getting family and friends together to enjoy food that we associate with the onset of winter.

Other countries and regions also celebrate Thanksgiving to a lesser extent, often because of historical ties with the United States. Liberia was established by former American slaves, while Grenada uses it to commemorate a US-led invasion. Norfolk Island also celebrates Thanksgiving, largely because of American whalers who spent on the island.

Thanksgiving is a statutory holiday in the four countries that observe it. However, you’ll have to consider your friends’ and colleagues’ schedules if you plan to invite them. Thanksgiving falls on a weekday, so you can’t expect many people to binge on turkey, potatoes, and a bit of wine on a work night.

Few families that prepare a Thanksgiving meal today are actually farmers. As a result, the focus shifted from the autumn harvest to the ideas of togetherness and giving thanks. The most important part about Thanksgiving isn’t even the meal it’s about sitting around the table together with close friends and family to share the food that you have.

One way to demonstrate the best part of Thanksgiving to anyone that doesn’t celebrate it is to get every guest to bring a dish this brings everyone in line with the spirit of the occasion. As it’s typical to serve all of the dishes at a Thanksgiving meal at once, this is the perfect occasion to try a little bit of everything on offer.


Caramel Corn Mix

Caramel has that holiday flavor. It's savory and sweet, comforting, and smells good while you're making it. That's why this caramel corn mix is perfect for your candy-loving Thanksgiving guests. You can combine red, yellow, and orange M&Ms in this mixture, throw in some Rolos, or try your own unique combination.

Keep your candy dishes full of this sweet and salty mix, fill glass jars on your counter full of fresh batches, or use some on top of a chocolate frosted cake for a fun and rustic look. There's definitely no wrong way to eat this "candy corn" this Thanksgiving.


Thanksgiving on Norfolk Island

Since the mid 1890’s the community of Norfolk Island have been decorating All Saints Church and celebrating Thanksgiving together (this year the festivities begin at All Saints from 10am). But how did the most American of holidays end up on a remote island in the middle of the South Pacific?

According to Church of England Chaplain, Rev. David Fell the Pitcairners had always celebrated the English Harvest Home festival, but it was not until Isaac Robinson came to the island that All Saints Church was specially decorated for the service.

Robinson was a trader who settled on Norfolk as agent for Burns Philp & Co Ltd., later becoming Norfolk’s Registrar of Lands and the island’s first (and so far only) United States consul. “The idea of Norfolk having an American consul does sound slightly absurd today” Rev. Fell says, “but in those days American whalers made frequent calls, and Robinson proposed dressing the church up American-style for Thanksgiving.”

Three of Robinson’s friends helped him decorate All Saints Church in the capital, Kingston, using only palm leaves and lemons, and though he died and was buried at sea the next year, his notion caught on. For Norfolk’s second Thanksgiving service, the parishioners brought down all sorts of produce to decorate the church. “The tradition became to tie corn stalks to the pew ends and pile flowers on the altar and the font. At first, each family took home its own fruit and vegetables after the service, but today they are sold to raise money for church preservation.”

This year we are looking forward to having Bishop Michael Stead preach on Psalm 103. Also in attendance will be US Chargé d’Affaires, Mr. James Carouso and his wife Elizabeth.

Everyone is welcome to join in the festivities at All Saints from 10am Wednesday, 25 th of November (families are encouraged to contact Albert Buffett to book pews).


Sources

  • Baker, James W. (2009). Thanksgiving: the biography of an American holiday. UPNE. p.𧈑. ISBN  978-1584658016 .
  • Bangs, Jeremy D. "Thanksgiving on the Net: Roast Bull with Cranberry Sauce". Sail 1620. Society of Mayflower Descendants in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Archived from the original on November 2, 2012 . Retrieved October 23, 2012 .
  • Colman, Penny (2008). Thanksgiving: The True Story. Macmillan. p.𧆕. ISBN  978-0805082296 .
  • Dow, Judy Slapin, Beverly (June 12, 2006). "Deconstructing the Myths of "The First Thanksgiving " ". Oyate.org. Archived from the original on November 29, 2010 . Retrieved November 29, 2010 .
  • Hillstrom, Laurie Collier (2007). The Thanksgiving book: a companion to the holiday covering its history, lore, . Omnigraphics. p.𧉈. ISBN  978-0780804036 .
  • Hodgson, Godfrey (2006). A Great and Godly Adventure The Pilgrims and the Myth of the First Thanksgiving . New York: Public Affairs. p.𧇔. ISBN  978-1586483739 .


Watch the video: Thanksgiving in Norfolk Island AUS (May 2022).